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Boston, MA /

NOT canceled! Semantic Web Meetup: Toward Easier RDF

MIT Stata Center - Star Room 32 Vassar Street Star Room on 4th Floor, Cambridge, MA 02139 (map)

We're back this month! Please join us! And note the date change!

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Agenda:

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David Booth: Toward Easier RDF

RDF has clearly proven its value in the 18+ years since it was first standardized as the basis for the Semantic Web. Nonetheless, it is still treated as a niche technology, and uptake is limited to more elite development teams. *Average* development teams still find RDF too hard. This prevents RDF from being accepted into more mainstream use in situations where it otherwise would be a good fit. Why is this? And what can we do about it?

This presentation will lead a discussion on how RDF -- or perhaps even an RDF-inspired successor -- could be made easy enough for *average* development teams to use successfully. I will share some ideas I have collected, and I want to hear your ideas too! What difficulties have you heard or observed in working with RDF, or more broadly, the whole RDF ecosystem? Pet peeves? Frustrations? Unexpected difficulties? What makes it more complicated than it should be? What could be done to improve it? Bring your ideas to share!

About the speaker

David Booth is a co-organizer of the monthly Cambridge Semantic Web meetup. He is a senior software architect and has been involved with Semantic Web technology for over 10 years. In the past 5 years he has focused on applying this technology to problems in healthcare and life sciences at the Cleveland Clinic, PanGenX, KnowMED, pharma companies, and on a DoD-funded data migration project that uses RDF and related Semantic Web technology to achieve interoperability of diverse healthcare information. He was a W3C Fellow[masked], and holds a PhD in Computer Science from UCLA.

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